Zoran KuzmanovichChris AlexanderLarissa Hohe

Zoran Kuzmanovich - Davidson College

Zoran Kuzmanovich Son hints he will burn Nabokov's last work

Approaches to Teaching Nabokov's Lolita (Approaches to Teaching World Literature)

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  • Contributors: Vladimir E. Alexandrov, Yale University; Stephen H. Blackwell, University of Tennessee; Brian Boyd, University of Aukland; Clarence F. Brown, Princeton University; Julian W. Connolly, University of Virginia; Sergei Davydov, Middlebury College; Nina Demurova, University of Russian Academy of Education; Robert Dirig, Cornell University; John Burt Foster, Jr., George Mason University; D. Barton Johnson, UC Santa Barbara; Marina Kanevskaya, University of Montana; John M. Kopper, Dartmouth College; Zoran Kuzmanovich, Davidson College; Dmitri Nabokov; Charles Nicol, Indiana State University; Stephen Jan Parker, University of Kansas; Ellen Pifer, University of Delaware; Irena Ronen, University of Michigan; Omry Ronen, University of Michigan; Christine A. Rydel, Grand Valley State University; Gavriel Shapiro, Cornell University; Susan Elizabeth Sweeney, College of the Holy Cross; Leona Toker, Hebrew University; Joanna Maria Trzeciak, University of Chicago
    Lisa Zunshine, University of Kentucky

    Contributors: Vladimir E. Alexandrov, Yale University; Stephen H. Blackwell, University of Tennessee; Brian Boyd, University of Aukland; Clarence F. Brown, Princeton University; Julian W. Connolly, University of Virginia; Sergei Davydov, Middlebury College; Nina Demurova, University of Russian Academy of Education; Robert Dirig, Cornell University; John Burt Foster, Jr., George Mason University; D. Barton Johnson, UC Santa Barbara; Marina Kanevskaya, University of Montana; John M. Kopper, Dartmouth College; Zoran Kuzmanovich, Davidson College; Dmitri Nabokov; Charles Nicol, Indiana State University; Stephen Jan Parker, University of Kansas; Ellen Pifer, University of Delaware; Irena Ronen, University of Michigan; Omry Ronen, University of Michigan; Christine A. Rydel, Grand Valley State University; Gavriel Shapiro, Cornell University; Susan Elizabeth Sweeney, College of the Holy Cross; Leona Toker, Hebrew University; Joanna Maria Trzeciak, University of Chicago
    Lisa Zunshine, University of Kentucky

  • The Nabokov scholar Zoran Kuzmanovich, who was one of a chosen few to hear the writer’s son read an extract from several years ago, reported that it was “vintage Nabokov”.

    This discussion presents a response to recent questions regarding the role of suffering in Nabokov's work raised by Zoran Kuzmanovich and Elena Sommers. Both express anxiety over the almost pornographic depiction of a child's suffering in Nabokov's novel . Both also express dissatisfaction at the critical response to such suffering and both see the representation of horrific pain in fiction as problematic. Sommers argues that in Nabokov uses a narrative technique that compels readers to reconstruct the suffering of the child, David, within their imaginations. This technique compels readers to share David's pain. Through the suffering of characters, readers become aware of the suffering of others. These novels, says [End Page 83]Sommers, also rail against the crime of "incuriosity," a narrative injunction regarding the importance of details that has moral consequences. Thus, through these works, Nabokov deprives "death of the impersonality it brings with it" and contributes "his effort to the collective task of diminishing pain" (50). Still, for Sommers this contribution is a result of narrative technique and thus she accepts the literary reproduction of suffering as necessary and therapeutic.





    Third International Conference on Nabokov in Nice, France, June 21-23, 2006
    photographs by Ljuba Tarvi

    Opening Session: Julian W. Connolly with the microphone; to his left, Maurice Couturier, who organized the conference

    Opening Session: Ljuba Tarvi reading her paper

    Maurice Couturier (l.) on stage with Brian Boyd (center) and Jeff Edmunds (r.) minutes before the afternoon public presentations

    John Burt Foster responding to questions; in the foreground (l to r): D. Barton Johnson, Lara Delage-Toriel, Susan Elizabeth Sweeney

    Priscilla Meyer responding to questions; to her right, Julian W. Connolly; to her left, Zoran Kuzmanovich and Brian Boyd

    Gala dinner at the Westminster Hotel, 27, Promenade des Anglais; in the foreground, Jeff Edmunds and his wife Lori (l.) and Gennady Barabtarlo (r.) in conversation with Galya Diment (center) and her husband, Rami Grunbaum

     


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  • Name Title and Company Location Updated
    Zoran Kuzmanovich Professor of English and Chair
    Davidson , North Carolina   11/4/15

    In the late 1990s Dmitri Nabokov read a portion of the book to a group of about 20 scholars at a centenary celebration of his father at . The scholars and claim to have read the manuscript. In 1999 two passages from were published in , a scholarly publication devoted to Nabokov. Zoran Kuzmanovich, a scholar of Nabokov, said of passages he heard at Cornell University, "It sounds as though the story is about aging but holding onto the original love of one's life."

Faculty & Staff - Davidson College

Zoran Kuzmanovich is one of the most brilliant men I've ever met. but, he's so brilliant that you may have a hard time following his logic sometimes.. Regardless, he kept the class very interesting and really knows his stuff! Great professor! I definitley would take another class with him!